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Re: March 2019 device limit policy

Super User

I agree with you.  I am talking about the USA, that is where I am from and that's where Dropbox was started.  I don't make even close to 150K a year.  You would laugh at what I make a year.  Yes, there are poor countries and yes, I would agree it would be too much.  What I pay ($10) is not much for the majority of users.  I use Google also and I also use icloud.  I consider its worth it to me to pay that price.  Now I do agree and read that there is a lot of users who do not agree with the price.  I am just posting my opinion like everyone else.  What I am a little concern is the attitude that Dropbox owes us.  They don't owe us anything.  Thanks for posting your views, that is what this thread is about.  


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Re: March 2019 device limit policy

Level 4

I think you're getting hung up on the money, and it's not about money to me. I don't make 150K$, but I'm in the neighborhood, and I could easily handle 10$ a month, or even 20$ or 30$. On the other hand, I know what the backend costs are on a service like this, and I feel ill-used that a formerly free and useful service has now unilaterally changed their terms and is forcing a pay issue. Took me about 5 minutes to get local fs mount setup for my Google storage, and another 15 or so to copy all my Dropbox data out to there. The problem for me is that now I need to go do that about fifteen times. If Dropbox had a plan on offer that suited me (say about 200-500GB for a yearly 50$ fee), I would have done that in a minute. I don't care for monthly charges and will take on the annoyance of moving to a different service instead. It's an annoyance, and it'll be a fairly large number of occurances as I switch over all of my PCs and devices, but it's a finite number. The monthly charges are an indefinite number of annoyances. Adios, Dropbox!

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Re: March 2019 device limit policy

Level 8
I completely get where you’re coming from. It’s the less tech-savvy users who are most disrupted by this. They may be willing to pay a little for the service, but they have used it for years trouble-free and now need to understand how to try to make it work for their needs.
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Re: March 2019 device limit policy

Level 5

@Spersephone wrote:
I completely get where you’re coming from. It’s the less tech-savvy users who are most disrupted by this. They may be willing to pay a little for the service, but they have used it for years trouble-free and now need to understand how to try to make it work for their needs.

Thanks for understanding… 

This is not an easy process to do with them. It was not well communicated. Took everyone by surprise and leaving many users that have had things set to work suddenly not able with no clear reason why and no understandable method of solving the problem on their own.

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Re: March 2019 device limit policy

Level 8
Please note that existing linked devices do continue to work. Hence, claiming that users have been suddenly disrupted is a bit misleading.

They might be in the future, but that's slightly different. The problem does not lie in the change itself, but in how it was (not) communicated.

The change should not be surprising. They essentially say "You have been using Dropbox for business purposes for ten years without paying a dime? OK now we will limit you to 3 devices." That shall not sound so crazy by itself. It is a bit crazy because of the price they put, but they are entitled to that if they so desire.

A user wanting to sync their computer to they smartphone and tablet or secondary computer can do so. A user having 10 devices is most likely using it for business or can afford to pay like he/she afforded to buy 10 devices in the first place.

Logging in the web interface to manage your linked devices is about basic computer literacy, which applies to Google and Facebook accounts as well. It does not require advanced skills.
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Re: March 2019 device limit policy

Level 6

I repeat ... all of us free loaders are several things, we are realestate so Dropbox can say to businesses, "look we have umpteen million users out there, a good reputation etc.", a free sales force, PR, free advertising etc. Word of mouth is normally the most powerful sales tool that exists by far, it can be a big killer of business too. If that realestate gets too small then fee payers might start looking elsewhere for more popular platforms such as Google Drive. If that realestate takes their paying customers away then that's a further loss. Dropbox may survive as a smaller niche supplier to some businesses but I fail to see how this will benefit them in the long run.

Dropbox and other companies do not necessarily give free out of the goodness of their hearts, it's a strategy. You get the product out there, you add value (let me repeat "YOU ADD VALUE") and then attach a price to it hoping that there will be enough take up to make a boat load of money. What I am surpised at is that Dropbox would hobble their own product. I don't understand their current strategy. Perhaps the value add is not good enough, perhaps their price points are wrong. There are others out there doing the same but are too greedy on their price points which drives their user base to their competitors even though their product is good, Teamviewer for example.

Yes, Dropbox can do what they want with their product but make the wrong decision and they could be toast. Without understanding their strategy it's hard to say but it could be a last ditch attempt by a failing company. I think the likes of Google Drive and Office365 will end up nailing the lid on their coffin although they could survive as an increasingly obscure nich provider.

Some thoughts and at a very wild guess - 10 million users paying $10 a year is $100 million. 100,000 users paying $100 a year is $10 million!

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Re: March 2019 device limit policy

Level 6

And another thing; $10 a month is not much! I agree $10 a month is not much. But ... wait a minute ... Netflix $10 a month, Spotify $12 a month, service C $30 a month, service D $20 a month. So what's that .. ohhh $82 a month. Now as you will say, you don't have to have all these services and indeed you don't it's choices but depending on your income etc. you are going start saying yes to this and no to that; if you have all desired services you could end up on the street quite easily. Sooooo, if I can get a service that will do the job for $2 a month instead of $10 a month ... well obviously ...

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Re: March 2019 device limit policy

Level 6

Please note that existing linked devices do continue to work. Hence, claiming that users have been suddenly disrupted is a bit misleading.

Actually, keep in mind, device can include App. I was caught off guard on a phone that IS working, but an App I haven't used in a while needed reauthenticating with DropBox and would not complete the authentication even though the PHONE IS authenticated because I am WAY over the 3 "device" limit. If you use Drobox on your phone, for various apps to move files, like the sound file I was trying to move back in March, you find out real quick that 3 is NOTHING!!!

I agree $10 a month is not much. But ... wait a minute ... Netflix $10 a month...

Exactly!! For me...add on Amazon Prime + Cell Phone + Dreamhost (Website) + Spectrum (Home Internet) + Smugmug + others I am sure bill me and I don't even remember! So, the $10 is not the challenge. At least for me, I have a LOT of service that surely could be handeling a DropBox solution!!

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Re: March 2019 device limit policy

Level 5

 


>Please note that existing linked devices do continue to work. Hence, claiming that users have been suddenly disrupted is a bit misleading.

I think many users have shared how disruptive it actually is. Software upgrade, device doesn't link, MacOS upgrade, device doesn't link, re-install dropbox, device doesn't link, and so on. Dropbox support has also not been helpful in re-linking existing devices. So I suspect every user with more than 3 devices (I'm sure dropbox knows how many there are) will be disrupted shortly. 

Perhaps the three device limit will work for many users: 1) own a smart phone, 1 device, 2) own a laptop, one device, 3) have a seperate office computer, last device. Anything beyond that you need to consider a seperate cloud service. Plus as it has been discussed on the forum, it's whether dropbox thinks you have more than three devices (not actually have them) that maters. You'll be disrupted even if you own 1 device but dropbox shows it linked multiple times. 

>The problem does not lie in the change itself, but in how it was (not) communicated.

Agree. 

>The change should not be surprising. They essentially say "You have been using Dropbox for business purposes for ten years without paying a dime? OK now we will limit you to 3 devices."

Agree, it's their business and they can run it however they like. I'm certain that the move was intentional to pressure existing freeriders to take part in the market. 500 million free riders, force them to upgrade or stop using the service, 1% upgrade means 500 annual million in revenue for them (might be working as in January 12.7 million users paid for premium services - From 4th qrt 2018 fiscal report and the 1st qrt 2019 fiscal report showed that 13.2 million users are now paying?). Smart business move for investors in the short term. Unclear how that will pay off in the long term as the power of dropbox is its ability collaborate. If people you want to collaborate with are using a difference service there will be pressure to switch to that service. 

>A user having 10 devices is most likely using it for business or can afford to pay like he/she afforded to buy 10 devices in the first place. 

I "had" a separate dropbox business account but will no longer consider dropbox as a viable cloud offering for the primary reason that I need to be able to share and collaborate with the "freeriders" dropbox is trying to force from their user base. And device restrictions is a clear attempt to eliminate freeriders (which again they can do). But each semester I used to sign up students to dropbox to share course materials. I don't want to nor expect these students to have to manage the "three device limit" when there are plenty of other options out there that do not implement this limit. The last thing I need is to manage IT support for students. 

I always enjoyed that Dropbox just worked, having to go and periodically remove devices or pay in order to use the service was actually a good incentive to finally look at other options as I already had to manage not putting something confidential (like students grades) on Dropbox since Dropbox doesn't meet many countries’ privacy laws. 

 Plus, like many, I feel a bit betrayed. I had a business account so I supported dropbox, but also a freerider account where in exchange for my word of mouth selling the service they provided me with a bonus in space. I felt we completed a transaction, of which the value of the exchange has been diminished by dropbox. I was understanding of the change to device count but when dropbox refused to re-link an existing device (they may do this for others...) it was made clear that since going public Dropbox has new priorities and early adopters are not one of them.

So when forced to choose I decided to give my money to another provider. I'm able to cloud link my freeloader dropbox account so I can access files that I have to leave on dropbox for now until I can have everyone I know and work with move off of dropbox. As with many of those upset on the forum, I serve as a technology influencer for my network so its pretty easy to get everyone to move off of dropbox and recommend those that are paying think about choosing another service.

I believe, Dropbox's lack of communication and lack of support have created an antagonistic user base. Perhaps nothing will come of it or perhaps we'll see a shift to other services. Dropbox do you remember myspace, yahoo, palm, netscape, mapquest, aol, tivo? Users can and will move on to other services.

I've probably spent more much time reading the forums than I would have managing my freeloader account grinning face but company motivations and the implications of their actions are fascinating to me. If Dropbox succeeds, good for them and their shareholders. But I'll stop using Dropbox to reference cloud storage just like I no longer useKleenex when I want a tissue. 

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Re: March 2019 device limit policy

Level 7

@sac6218 wrote:

 

I "had" a separate dropbox business account but will no longer consider dropbox as a viable cloud offering for the primary reason that I need to be able to share and collaborate with the "freeriders" dropbox is trying to force from their user base.

 

You are not alone. Since April, I have had 25 people so far (and another 2 booked) have me (many have paid me, for simple ones I have just taken the 1GB bonus from Sync) move them to Sync, plus a few consolodating to Onedrive, Google, or iCloud. Three of those were paid Dropbox accounts moving partially due to not being able to share with people who had been forced off o Dropbox.

/p>

I always enjoyed that Dropbox just worked, having to go and periodically remove devices or pay in order to use the service was actually a good incentive to finally look at other options

It also stunned me how much better computers worked after removing Dropbox. Commonly a 6x improvement in boot-to-usable speed (3 min to 30 sec) and a large increase in free resources.

as I already had to manage not putting something confidential (like students grades) on Dropbox since Dropbox doesn't meet many countries’ privacy laws. 

I would like to thank Dropbox, for making me reread the terms of service. It made me see that asside from the privace law issues of storing private client information on US servers, I found they had added the right to share the CONTENT of your files with so-called "trusted third parties". 

As with many of those upset on the forum, I serve as a technology influencer for my network so its pretty easy to get everyone to move off of dropbox and recommend those that are paying think about choosing another service.

Ditto.

 

 

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March 2019 device limit policy
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