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Is anyone else furious at the upgrade to 2TB and extra $60 a year without consent?

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Re: Is anyone else furious at the upgrade to 2TB and extra $60 a year without consent?

Helpful | Level 6

My team has migrated to Sync.  It works much like a simplified Dropbox.  None of the irritating "features" of Dropbox, a simplified notifcation center, good prices, and great support.  We are so much happier and breathing a sigh of relief.

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Re: Is anyone else furious at the upgrade to 2TB and extra $60 a year without consent?

Explorer | Level 3
Dropbox has tricked the world into thinking sharing files is hard. Do not use this service
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Re: Is anyone else furious at the upgrade to 2TB and extra $60 a year without consent?

Collaborator | Level 10

Hi there

 

I do not agree with you.

 

Dropbox is far superior to the other cloud providers (Google Drive, OneDrive and OneDrive for Business). I know there's many others, but these are the ones I used in the past, and still use, and can provide a proper comment on.

 

As I mentioned in a post a few weeks ago, do a simple test: assuming you use Outlook, export your entire mailbox to a PST file. Close Outlook. Upload the exact same file to Dropbox, Google and OneDrive. Not all at once. Take down the time it takes to upload the file. Make some changes to your email (send a few mails) and export the file to PST again. Close Outlook. Repeat the upload process and and take down the time to sync. Dropbox will be at least 80% faster to upload the PST file as they do block syncing, where Google and OneDrive will upload the entire file again. If your PST is say 12GB in size (like mine) and I have about 7 or 8 email accounts, think of the time you save, the bandwidth you save, and the productivity you gain in just one simple example.

 

Also, if you have multiple devices on your network, LAN sync is a life saver. Think Smart Sync. Passwords. Backups. Vault.

 

There are talks of cheaper Dropbox options (heard from an inside source) but this is not confirmed.

 

Dropbox works. Period. I cannot remember the number of times that I had to restart the Backup and Sync app on my laptop while I still used Google Drive to sync my files and find it very unreliable although Google Support is better in my opinion.

 

Dropbox is lightyears ahead with their smart workplace offer. You just need to get used to it. And when you integrated the apps you use regularly, your productivity will skyrocket.

 

Dropbox is no longer just a sync app. They've evolved. And continuous evolvement takes man power and that costs money.

 

You get what you pay for.

 

I agree that they may be more expensive than other cloud offerings (Microsoft being the cheapest for what you get) but since I am a Dropbox user for many years, and happy with their service and reliability, I will not move back (although I do use the others too, because I have to for other businesses I work for/with).

 

Regards

 

Casper

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Re: Is anyone else furious at the upgrade to 2TB and extra $60 a year without consent?

Explorer | Level 3

I haven't read every message in the thread, but I don't think most of the complaints are about the quality of the service. They seem to be about the pricing and the fact of forcing you into a higher tier than you need. I was a Plus subscriber for a long time but found it necessary to downgrade. I came back today with the intention of returning to Plus, but I don't need 2 TB nor can I afford $100-120 per year just to store files. I work at a university and thought there might be educational pricing available (as many other companies offer), but all I can see is that there's nothing but they'll think about it. It appears that all the talk I've seen over the past couple of years about the responsiveness (or lack thereof) of Dropbox to their customers is true. Guess I'll just keep muddling through with the free version for those apps that require Dropbox to communicate.

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Re: Is anyone else furious at the upgrade to 2TB and extra $60 a year without consent?

Helpful | Level 5

For all this money, has anyone commented that the web app is 15 years behind the opposition? You still can't right-click to  perform basic tasks. It feels super clunky!

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Re: Is anyone else furious at the upgrade to 2TB and extra $60 a year without consent?

Collaborator | Level 9

 

@Casper777  I feel that reply warrants some balance.

 

I had been a Dropbox user for many years (on multiple platforms - including Linux). I'll reply to your comments inline...

 


@Casper777 wrote:

Hi there

 

I do not agree with you.

 

Dropbox is far superior to the other cloud providers (Google Drive, OneDrive and OneDrive for Business). I know there's many others, but these are the ones I used in the past, and still use, and can provide a proper comment on.

 

Personal opinion so not really relevant. I could equally argue OneDrive provides comparable service.

 

As I mentioned in a post a few weeks ago, do a simple test: assuming you use Outlook, export your entire mailbox to a PST file. Close Outlook. Upload the exact same file to Dropbox, Google and OneDrive. Not all at once. Take down the time it takes to upload the file. Make some changes to your email (send a few mails) and export the file to PST again. Close Outlook. Repeat the upload process and and take down the time to sync. Dropbox will be at least 80% faster to upload the PST file as they do block syncing, where Google and OneDrive will upload the entire file again. If your PST is say 12GB in size (like mine) and I have about 7 or 8 email accounts, think of the time you save, the bandwidth you save, and the productivity you gain in just one simple example.

 

Giving you the benefit of the doubt I presume you chose that file as an example of a large file. Syncing a local PST file (or *ANY* email files) is ridiculous - the email should be configured to use IMAP and not sync the PST files. Onedrive does do differential (what you call block level sync changes) so that is wrong. See https://www.windowscentral.com/onedrive-rolls-out-differential-sync-save-you-time-and-data-when-sync...

 

Also, if you have multiple devices on your network, LAN sync is a life saver. Think Smart Sync. Passwords. Backups. Vault.

Given Dropbox's security record their password offering does not seem remotely attractive.

 

There are talks of cheaper Dropbox options (heard from an inside source) but this is not confirmed.

 

Dropbox works. Period. I cannot remember the number of times that I had to restart the Backup and Sync app on my laptop while I still used Google Drive to sync my files and find it very unreliable although Google Support is better in my opinion.

 

Dropbox is lightyears ahead with their smart workplace offer. You just need to get used to it. And when you integrated the apps you use regularly, your productivity will skyrocket.

 

You are making assumptions people want to use it for work. While Dropbox may be pivoting to try to attract the business market decisions like this have alienated home customers for little benefit

Dropbox is no longer just a sync app. They've evolved. And continuous evolvement takes man power and that costs money.

 

You get what you pay for.

 

I agree that they may be more expensive than other cloud offerings (Microsoft being the cheapest for what you get) but since I am a Dropbox user for many years, and happy with their service and reliability, I will not move back (although I do use the others too, because I have to for other businesses I work for/with).

 

Regards

 

Casper


 

The only advantage they have is a native Linux client but I am able to get Insync working fine on Linux. Dropbox burnt their home users trying to attract businesses with a ridiculous pricing move. I have successfully moved to OneDrive for Linux, Windows, Android and its working fine. Plus I get loads more benefits.
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Re: Is anyone else furious at the upgrade to 2TB and extra $60 a year without consent?

Explorer | Level 3

I was a Plus user for a very long time. When they upped the price and storage with no alternative, I canceled my Plus and went to the free plan for a few minimal things I need to store in Dropbox because of the sync between platforms. I, too, would be happy to pay for a 500GB or 1TB plan. I cannot, for the life of me, figure out why companies are so willing to leave a huge amount of money on the table by not offering customers what they need. I'm sure it costs them nothing to offer different pricing plans and getting a customer at 500GB or 1TB might just be a stepping stone to a larger plan. They could even name them "Plus Gold" (the current 2TB plan), "Plus Silver" (1TB), and "Plus Bronze" (500 GB). Or, if Bronze sounds too cheap, go Platinum, Gold, and Silver! There...the naming is done. Now just implement it.

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Re: Is anyone else furious at the upgrade to 2TB and extra $60 a year without consent?

New member | Level 2
Yes!!! Just been billed $399 for an upgrade I didn’t know about or request! Have opened a dispute with my credit card company
It’s outrageous

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