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HTTP endpoint results in too_many_write_operations

HTTP endpoint results in too_many_write_operations

Lars2
New member | Level 2

Hi,

 

When doing an initial sync with dropbox from our app we sometimes receive a 429 "too_many_write_operations". I have read https://www.dropbox.com/developers/reference/data-ingress-guide and want to check if using batch upload will "fix" this, meaning that there is no limit in write_operations. Is that correct?

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Re: HTTP endpoint results in too_many_write_operations

Greg-DB
Dropboxer
It won't remove the limit entirely, but it should certainly improve performance significantly.

Essentially, the "too_many_write_operations" is a matter of "lock contention", in that multiple simultaneous calls to /files/upload try to take a lock and compete with each other.

Using /files/upload_session/finish_batch instead consolidates where the lock is taken. Each call to /files/upload_session/finish_batch also takes a lock, but you can commit multiple files using that single call and lock, so it generally works out better than using multiple calls to /files/upload.

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1 Reply 1

Re: HTTP endpoint results in too_many_write_operations

Greg-DB
Dropboxer
It won't remove the limit entirely, but it should certainly improve performance significantly.

Essentially, the "too_many_write_operations" is a matter of "lock contention", in that multiple simultaneous calls to /files/upload try to take a lock and compete with each other.

Using /files/upload_session/finish_batch instead consolidates where the lock is taken. Each call to /files/upload_session/finish_batch also takes a lock, but you can commit multiple files using that single call and lock, so it generally works out better than using multiple calls to /files/upload.
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